Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist (2008)

Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist (2008)

2008 | PG-13 | 89 Minutes

Drama | Comedy | Romance | Music

Nick cannot stop obsessing over his ex-girlfriend, Tris, until Tris' friend Norah suddenly shows interest in him at a club. Thus beings an odd night filled with ups and downs as the two keep runnin...

Overall Rating

6 / 10
Verdict: Good

User Review

  • Nick & Norah's Infinite Playlist musically selects every romantic cliché with tone deaf results. Not every quirky romantic comedy measures the decibels of a high-pitched orgasm, but sweet lord Nick & Norah did. And now I'm scarred for life. Thanks. So, like with most pretentious comedy-dramas of the late naughties, the hyperactive quirky aesthetic that plagued the forced romance with the underdeveloped hip-indie music scene was so overpowering that it forced me to question my own music taste. Should I be listening to "queercore"? Am I supposed to know about Electric Lady Studios? Either way, the film is as forgettable as Cera's long list of "samey" musically-inept comedies (minus 'Scott Pilgrim', that film is the Sex Bob-Omb). Norah asks Nick to be her pretend boyfriend for five minutes, inadvertently angering his ex, to which they embark on a night where they must find a secret show hosted by their favourite band.

    Despite glimpses of real chemistry between leads Cera and Dennings, most notably when visiting the sound studio, the romance is grossly undercooked to the point where I'd rather see Nick get back with his ex who is suggestively revealing herself on top of his trashy wagon. A romantic comedy can only work if both tentative love and laughs/smiles are present. Well firstly, Scafaria's screenplay is more intently focussed on representing gay culture than actual humour. Which is absolutely fine, if it didn't feel so forced. Secondly, the scattershot narrative prevents the main characters from establishing any real connection other than their love for music.

    Sollett's intention in coming across as "alternative", with a myriad of generic songs comprising the soundtrack, seems more important than the actual romance. Sure, at times the quirky aesthetic suits the tone, but when it's so forced (there's that word again...) at the expense of character development, well, it's a no from me. Cera's awkward personality compliments Dennings' deadpan line delivery, which makes this coupling a complete missed opportunity. Shame. Don't get me started on the pointless gay cabaret scene...